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Akilathirattu Ammanai Book Free 11


Akilathirattu Ammanai Book Free 11




Akilathirattu Ammanai is the main religious text of the Tamil belief system Ayyavazhi, which is officially a branch of Hinduism. The book contains more than 15,000 verses and narrates the story of God coming in this age, the Kali Yuga, to transform the world into the Dharma Yuga. The book was written by Hari Gopalan Citar in 1839 CE, who claimed that he was dictated by God in his sleep. The book is also known as Thiru Edu, which means venerable book, or Akilam or Akilathirattu, which are shortened forms of the title.


If you are interested in reading this book, you can download it for free from the following link: [Akilathirattu Ammanai PDF]. This is a scanned copy of the original palm leaf manuscript, which was printed in 1939. The book is in Tamil language and has two parts: the first part deals with the history of the previous ages and the second part deals with the activities of Ayya Vaikundar, who is considered as the incarnation of God in Ayyavazhi.


Download: https://t.co/Vtelqd2tsa


You can also read more about this book and its significance from these sources: [Wikipedia article], [Religion Wiki article], and [Wikiwand article]. These articles provide an overview of the book's content, style, structure, and interpretation. They also explain the relationship between Ayyavazhi and Hinduism, and how the book reinterprets the Hindu scriptures and myths.


Akilathirattu Ammanai is a unique and fascinating book that reveals a different perspective on religion and spirituality. It is a valuable source of knowledge and wisdom for anyone who wants to learn more about Ayyavazhi and its teachings. You can download and read it for free from the link provided above. The article continues as follows: Ayya Vaikundar's life and mission were not well received by the authorities of the Travancore kingdom, who saw him as a threat to their power and religion. He was arrested several times and tortured by the police and the Brahmins. He was also accused of being a Christian missionary and a rebel leader. However, he gained a large following among the oppressed and marginalized people, especially the lower castes, who saw him as their savior and liberator. He performed many miracles and healed many diseases, which increased his popularity and fame. He also established a new social order based on equality and justice, and abolished the caste system and untouchability. He preached against the evils of Kali Yuga and urged his followers to follow the path of Dharma.


Ayya Vaikundar's most significant act was his journey to Vaikundam, the abode of Vishnu, where he defeated Kali and his seven henchmen, who were responsible for the corruption and suffering in the world. He then merged with Vishnu and became one with him. He returned to earth with a new name, Sriman Narayana, and a new body, which was radiant and divine. He also brought with him a conch and a discus, the symbols of Vishnu's power. He declared that he was the supreme God and that he had come to establish a new age of righteousness, called Dharma Yukam. He also announced that he would take his faithful devotees to Vaikundam after their death, where they would enjoy eternal bliss.


Ayya Vaikundar's mission lasted for about 18 years, during which he traveled across South India and spread his message to millions of people. He also established six sacred places, called Pathis, where he performed rituals and ceremonies for the welfare of humanity. He also appointed five disciples, called Thangals, who were entrusted with the responsibility of continuing his work after his departure. He also composed many songs and verses, which are collected in the Arul Nool, a supplementary scripture of Ayyavazhi.


Ayya Vaikundar left his mortal body in 1851 CE at Muttappathi, one of the Pathis he had founded. His followers cremated his body and built a shrine over his ashes, which is now known as Swamithope Pathi, the headquarters of Ayyavazhi. His followers believe that he is still alive in spirit and that he will return to earth at the end of Kali Yuga to usher in Dharma Yukam. They also believe that he is present in every living being and that he can be invoked by chanting his name or by reading his scriptures. The article continues as follows: Dharma Yukam is the ultimate goal of Ayyavazhi followers, who believe that they will attain it after the destruction of Kali Yuga and the establishment of a new age of righteousness by Lord Vaikundar. Dharma Yukam is not a physical place, but a state of absolute bliss, where there is no pain, sorrow, or suffering. It is also a state of harmony, where there is no discrimination, oppression, or injustice. It is a state of unity, where there is no distinction between God and his devotees, and where all beings are equal and respectful to each other. It is a state of liberation, where there is no bondage to karma, rebirth, or illusion. It is a state of perfection, where there is no flaw, defect, or imperfection.


Dharma Yukam is described in the Akilam seventeen in Akilathirattu Ammanai, the main religious text of Ayyavazhi. The book narrates how Lord Vaikundar, who is considered as the incarnation of God in this age, defeated Kali and his seven henchmen, who were responsible for the corruption and suffering in the world. He then merged with Vishnu and became one with him. He also brought with him a conch and a discus, the symbols of Vishnu's power. He declared that he was the supreme God and that he had come to establish a new age of righteousness, called Dharma Yukam. He also announced that he would take his faithful devotees to Vaikundam after their death, where they would enjoy eternal bliss.


If you want to know more about Dharma Yukam and its significance in Ayyavazhi mythology, you can read some web articles from these links: [Wikipedia article] and [Wikiwand article]. These articles provide an overview of Dharma Yukam's content, style, structure, and interpretation. They also explain the relationship between Ayyavazhi and Hinduism, and how Dharma Yukam reinterprets the Hindu scriptures and myths. The article continues as follows: Ayyavazhi is a Tamil belief system that emerged in the 19th century in South India. It is officially recognized as a branch of Hinduism, but it has many distinctive features and practices that set it apart from other Hindu sects. Ayyavazhi followers believe that God has incarnated in this age as Ayya Vaikundar, who is the supreme and final manifestation of God. They also believe that Ayya Vaikundar has come to destroy the evil forces of Kali Yuga and to establish a new age of righteousness, called Dharma Yukam. They also believe that Ayya Vaikundar is present in every living being and that he can be invoked by chanting his name or by reading his scriptures.


Ayyavazhi has a rich and diverse tradition of rituals, ceremonies, festivals, and pilgrimages, which are performed by its followers to express their devotion and faith in Ayya Vaikundar. Some of the most important rituals are the Thiru Eadu Vasippu, which is the daily reading of the Akilathirattu Ammanai, the main religious text of Ayyavazhi; the Thuvayal Thavasu, which is a 12-day penance performed by devotees who seek to attain spiritual enlightenment; the Kodiyettru Thirunal, which is the annual flag-hoisting festival celebrated at all the Pathis, the sacred places established by Ayya Vaikundar; and the Masi Procession, which is a grand procession of devotees from Swamithope Pathi to Muttappathi, where Ayya Vaikundar attained Samadhi.


Ayyavazhi has a unique and dynamic social vision, which aims to create a society based on equality and justice. Ayyavazhi followers reject the caste system and untouchability, which are prevalent in Hindu society, and advocate for the rights and dignity of all people, especially the oppressed and marginalized. Ayyavazhi also promotes education, health, environment, and social service as part of its mission to uplift humanity. Ayyavazhi has many organizations and institutions that work for these causes, such as the Akilathirattu Ammanai Noolakam, which is a publishing house that prints and distributes Ayyavazhi literature; the Akilathirattu Ammanai Peravai, which is an association that organizes seminars and conferences on Ayyavazhi topics; and the Akilathirattu Ammanai Trust, which is a charitable trust that runs schools, hospitals, orphanages, and old-age homes.


If you want to know more about Ayyavazhi and its history, beliefs, practices, and social vision, you can read some web articles from these links: [Wikipedia article], [Britannica article], [Religion Facts article], and [Ayya Vaikundar website]. These articles provide an overview of Ayyavazhi's content, style, structure, and interpretation. They also explain the relationship between Ayyavazhi and Hinduism, and how Ayyavazhi reinterprets the Hindu scriptures and myths. The article continues as follows: Akilathirattu Ammanai is not the only religious text of Ayyavazhi, but it is the most important and authoritative one. It is considered as the word of God, revealed to Hari Gopalan Citar, who wrote it down in 1839 CE. The book is divided into two parts: the first part deals with the history of the previous ages and the second part deals with the activities of Ayya Vaikundar, who is considered as the incarnation of God in this age. The book is written in a poetic style, using various literary devices and symbols to convey its message. The book also contains many references and quotations from other Hindu scriptures, such as the Vedas, the Puranas, and the Ramayana.


The book has a complex and layered structure, which can be understood at different levels of interpretation. The book can be read as a historical narrative, which chronicles the events and characters that shaped the world from the beginn


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